Face Mask Sensor to Detect COVID-19

Diseases, General, Good products - Bad products

Our breath holds a multitude of biomarkers, including potentially those indicating the presence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19. Those infected with the virus are prone to exhale proteases, enzymes that speed up the breakdown of proteins, related to the new virus. This has led researchers at University of California, San Diego to work on developing a wearable sensor that can be attached to masks to detect the presence of these proteases and therefore the COVID-19 virus.

“In many ways, masks are the perfect ‘wearable’ sensor for our current world,” said Jesse Jokerst, professor of nanoengineering at UC San Diego, who is the lead researcher of this project, in a press release...

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Smart Ring Monitors Body Temperature, May Spot COVID Fever Early

Diseases, General, Good products - Bad products

A team of researchers, including those at the University of California, San Francisco and University of California, San Diego, has tested the potential of a smart ring, that can collect health data, including temperature and heart rate, to detect fever associated with COVID-19. In a proof-of-concept study, the researchers showed that the ring, developed by a Finnish startup called Oura, could detect fevers before patients began to experience symptoms, suggesting that the technology could function as an early warning system for COVID-19.

Identifying COVID-19 infections early and implementing quarantine immediately could help to limit the spread of the virus and allow patients to receive care early...

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Rapid Identification of Antibiotic-Resistant Infections: Interview with Jong Lee, CEO at Day Zero Diagnostics

Diseases, General, Good products - Bad products

Antibiotic resistance is a growing concern, with some predictions suggesting that routine surgery could be unacceptably risky in a future where many antibiotics have become obsolete. Part of the problem lies in the time it takes clinicians to diagnose an antibiotic-resistant infection. Current techniques involve lab technicians culturing a bacterial sample until it can be analyzed for drug resistance. The whole process takes days, and by the time the test provides an answer, a patient could be dead from sepsis.

To address this, clinicians typically administer broad-spectrum antibiotics in an effort to bring an infection under control. However, this does not always work if the bacteria present are resistant, and can result in further drug resistance...

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